Post division wound aftercare

June 20, 2017

Post division aftercare​

In some cases, division of tongue-tie is all that is needed to improve breast feeding. However, it is usually not an instant fix and ongoing help and support is usually required. Your health visitor or midwife will be able to advise you of good breast feeding support groups. If you have concerns about your baby's feeding, particularly if these persist a week post division, please do contact me to discuss.

 

Your baby may have swallowed some blood after the procedure so vomit may look red/brown In the first few hours after the procedure. Stools may also be streaked black in the first 24 hours. If the wound is disturbed in the first couple of days it may bleed again. This should be slight and stop within a few minutes if the baby is fed or sucks on a finger. If the bleeding doesn't stop then seek medical advice immediately.

 

Some babies experience a little swelling under the tongue and may find latching and feeding difficult for a few days post surgery. These babies may find being fed expressed milk until the swelling settles if they do not want to breast feed.

After a day or two the wound under the tongue may turn white and resemble a diamond shape. This is normal and will disappear after about a week. As it heals the edges may look orange in colour and the patch may have a yellow/green tinge. If the wound looks weepy or oozes then you will need to see a GP to exclude infection.

 

Some babies can be quite unsettled and appear uncomfortable. Babies over 8 weeks can have Infant Paracetamol as per the instructions on the bottle. With babies under 8 weeks you will need to consult your GP about pain relief. Most babies don't however need pain relief, just the reassurance of skin to skin and being carried usually works well.

 

 

 

Desensitising the palate - for babies who have high palatal arches who are resistant to a deep latch. Fingertip touches the palate at the front in midline, gradually work your way back, stopping at the point where the baby gagged last time. The point is to have a positive experience, not to reinforce negative by causing a gag. Over several sessions / days the finger can be gradually put further back on the palate.

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